Artivista – Baily Ludwick

Frida
Canela’s gum wrappers on canvas
18×24 in.

Baily Ludwick is an artist and student at UCSB devoted to raising awareness of the mistreatment of Mexicans in America through her artwork. The “artivista,” combining art and activism, utilizes a variety of mediums and symbolism to tell the story of her Mexican American heritage. Ludwick, who has been oil painting for 11 years, has gone on to explore new mediums such as repurposed gum wrappers and neon colors. Through her art, Ludwick expresses the feelings of a lack of belonging as a Mexican American. She also tackles prominent political issues like the US-Mexico border in The Border, President Trump’s No Tolerance Policy in I Care Do U?, and the president’s remarks on Mexican immigrants in Labels. Baily Ludwick aspires to incite social change with her emotionally-charged artwork.

I Care Do U?
Oil on canvas
24×30 in.
Baily Ludwick’s painting at the Families Belong Together rally in Las Vegas
Labels
Mixed Media
9.5×11 in.

“They’re bringing drugs. They’re bringing crime. They’re rapists.”

-Donald J. Trump

In Labels, Ludwick renames popular Mexican sparkling water brands, like Topo Chico, with derogatory terms that have been directed towards the Mexican community. She also adds tags of “criminal” and “lazy” to the revered Virgen de Guadalupe and Saint Martin de Porres, the patron saint of mixed-race people and her grandmother’s favorite saint, in order to reflect the absurdity of these stereotypes.

The Border
Watercolor on paper
11×14 in.
White Space
Ink on paper
11×14 in.
Inauthentic
Watercolor on paper
11×14 in.

Ludwick speaks of the importance of calling attention to the issues facing the Mexican community in her art:

“My great-great grandmother died because she was turned away from the hospital for being Mexican. When I hear these words of hatred, I feel the pain of discrimination running through my blood. I feel it is my duty to speak out against this hatred the only way I know how: through my paintbrush.”

-Baily Ludwick

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Phillip Byrne – Unselfing

As an Artist Phillip Byrne is interested in exploring holistic identity through process. Having been stripped of bodily, mental and emotional autonomy over the course of debilitating battles with Crohn’s Disease and Fluoroquinolone Toxicity Syndrome, art-making has allowed Phillip to play the role of ontological surgeon – placing his own metaphysical body on the dissection table and exploring its interior contents.

Phillip views his art practice as a kind of agriculture of ritual in which multiple processes are planted and their artifacts harvested. The foundational process – which cross-pollinates all subsequent rituals – consists of an experimental marbling practice in which ink, spray paint and float-able solids are suspended on the surface of water and mono-printed on paper.

The artist sees these mono prints – often manifesting as circular forms and geographical amalgamations – as cosmic eggs or embryos with transformative and alchemical potential.  These embryonic works are often replanted and re-harvested multiple times –  fragmented and reassembled, digitized and manipulated, projected into 3-dimensional space, and placed into new contexts. Engagement with these processes manifests personal associations and allows for personal explorations of the interior anatomies of Byrne’s mind/body/emotions, appraisals of their damages, and questionings of his relationship to all three.  The harvested artifacts of these nested rituals manifest as visual expressions in multiple voices – externalized vocalizations of an interior Babelian choir attempting to ontologically echo-locate and unify itself.

Phillip Bryne

Can be followed on instagram @moonspittles

Coastal Craze – A Solo Art Exhibition by Avery DeSantis

With support from Coastal fund UCSB associated students

Avery DeSantis


Untitled (Dots)
Untitled (Dots)
Photograph
Untitled (Boat)
Digital Photograph
Warmth
Warmth
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Restoration)
Digital Photograph
Low Lead Compliance
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Bird)
Digital Photograph
Resilience
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Brown and Blue)
Digital Photograph
Cloud Paint
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Wave)
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Layers)
Digital Photograph
Access
Digitally Edited Photograph

“Whether I am making observations through a microscope or camera lens, I strive to capture a unique view of the world around me.”

– Avery DeSantis

Stairs
Digital Photograph
Cheers
Digital Photograph
Imprinted Sands
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Bubbles 2)
Digital Photograph
Would You Like Your Receipt?
Digital Photograph
I Spy
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Bubbles)
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Starfish and Mussels)
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Reflection)
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Linear)
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Rocks)
Digital Photograph
Coastal Narrative
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Purple Flowers)
Digital Photograph
Camouflage
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Bird 2)
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Spider Web)
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Car Window)
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Footprints)
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Bug)
Digital Photograph
Fountain of Youth
Digital Photograph
Tranquility
Digital Photograph
Golden Branches
Digital Photograph
Adrift
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Flowers)
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Smile)
Digital Photograph
Lagoon Edge
Digital Photograph
Surf’s Up
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Yellow)
Digital Photograph
Petroleum Ambiance
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Shadows)
Digital Photograph
The Claw
Digital Photograph
Urchins Rising
Digital Photograph
Untitled (Kayak and Car)
Digital Photograph
Falling
Digital Photograph


Avery DeSantis is currently a fourth-year student at UCSB studying Biological Sciences with an Art Minor.

This exhibition strives to provide an interdisciplinary view of marine conservation. DeSantis believes that investigating this topic through art will help further distill the impact of climate change and pollution on ocean life. She also aims to create a lasting impression on the UCSB community and encourage others to preserve the local coastline. DeSantis’s main inspirations include her ongoing biology education, passion for conservation, and involvement in marine science research with the Hofmann Laboratory.

DeSantis would like to thank her faculty advisor, Dr. Helen Taschian, the Hofmann laboratory, and friends that have aided her along her journey.


Avery’s email: averydesantis@ucsb.edu